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This 4-week workshop takes place Tue, Nov 7, 14, 28, Dec 5.

How do your particular experiences and unique perspectives on desire, hurt, pleasure, and intimate moments materialize on the page? In this class, we will look at memoirs, essays, prose, poetry, and visual art to help you craft compelling lyric essays out of personal history and spaces. Our focus together will be on generating and revising resonant works of memoir. Participants are welcome to bring works-in-progress or come “fresh.” 

saretta

Saretta Morgan is a Brooklyn-based writer and artist born in Kentucky, who is concerned with the experience of intimate spaces. She has designed interactive, text-based experiences for The Whitney Museum of American Art, Dia Beacon, Tenri Cultural Institute, among other projects. Her chapbooks, Elegy Against an Obscured Interior (2017) and Feeling Upon Arrival (2018) are forthcoming from Portable Press @ Yo Yo Labs and Ugly Duckling Press, respectively. Morgan holds a BA from Columbia University and an MFA from Pratt Institute.

Members, sign up by phone at 210.734.9673 to receive a 15% discount.


 

In this generative workshop, we’ll learn from writers who’ve addressed some of the toughest issues of their times. We’ll look at poems from Wilhelm Klemm to Elyse Fenton, WWI to the present day. Our intent will be to isolate and consider craft tools often used by writers focusing on war and conflict so that we might incorporate these techniques within our own work. Please bring your preferred writing materials to the workshop.




Brian Turner is a poet and memoirist who served seven years in the US Army.  He is the author of the memoir My Life as a Foreign Country (2015) and two poetry collections, Phantom Noise and Here, Bullet, which won the 2005 Beatrice Hawley Award and the New York times “Editor’s Choice” selection, among other distinctions. He is the author of the poem “The Hurt Locker,” which inspired the 2009 Academy-Award-winning film. Turner’s work has been published in National Geographic, The New York Times, and other fine journals, and he has been awarded a United States Artists Fellowship, an NEA Fellowship, a Lannan Foundation Fellowship, and more.

*Free boxed lunch included in all 10am-3pm Saturday workshops.
Members, please sign up by phone at 210.734.9673 to receive 15% discount on class registration.
View our cancellation policy at geminiink.org/cancellation-policy

Life is a mass of details and distractions. Personal essays and memoirs are selections and arrangements of those details. Writing from memory involves leaving out the irrelevant or distracting and focusing on the essential. Explore what form is, then build it with blocks of carefully selected details. Read two short essays and write short pieces to generate new work.

Debra Monoe author photo 2015Debra Monroe is the author of six books, most recently My Unsentimental Education (2015). A “fierce” writer who presents “ever-hopeful lost souls with engaging humor and sympathy” (Kirkus Reviews), she has won the Flannery O’Connor Award. She’s published four novels and two memoirs. Her essays have appeared in the New York Times and Salon.com. Monroe lives in Austin and teaches at Texas State University.

 


CLASS FULL

 

*Members—please sign up by phone at 210.734.9673 to receive 10% discount on class registration.
Saturday 10am–3pm workshops include a light snack. Please bring a brown bag lunch.
View our cancellation policy here http://geminiink.org/cancellation-policy/

Ana Castillo discusses and reads from her new memoir Black Dove, followed by Q&A.

Ana Castillo is a Mexican-American Chicana novelist, poet, short story writer, essayist, editor, playwright, translator and independent scholar. Considered one of the leading voices in Chicana experience, Castillo is known for her experimental style as a Latina novelist. Her works offer pungent and passionate socio-political comment that is based on established oral and literary traditions. Castillo’s interest in race and gender issues can be traced throughout her writing career. Her novel Sapogonia was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She is the editor of La Tolteca, an arts and literary magazine. Castillo held the first Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Endowed Chair at DePaul University. She has attained a number of awards including an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation for her first novel, The Mixquiahuala Letters, a Carl Sandburg Award, a Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award, a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in fiction and poetry and in 1998 Sor Juana Achievement Award by the Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum in Chicago.

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This workshop has been cancelled due to a family emergency. It’s been rescheduled for July 9, 2016.

 

Life is a mass of details and distractions. Personal essays and memoirs are selections and arrangements of those details. Writing from memory involves leaving out the irrelevant or distracting and focusing on the essential. Explore what form is, then build it with blocks of carefully selected details. Read two short essays and write short pieces to generate new work.

Debra Monoe author photo 2015Debra Monroe is the author of six books, most recently My Unsentimental Education (2015). A “fierce” writer who presents “ever-hopeful lost souls with engaging humor and sympathy” (Kirkus Reviews), she has won the Flannery O’Connor Award. She’s published four novels and two memoirs. Her essays have appeared in the New York Times and Salon.com. Monroe lives in Austin and teaches at Texas State University.

 

 

Wed, Jan 27; Feb 3, 10, 17, 24; Mar 2, 9, 16
6:30 to 8pm, $135
Instructor: Bárbara Renaud González
Level: All

Examine ghosts that haunt you and write the story as memoir. Exploit the untold tales of parents, ancestors, relationship ghosts, ghosts of guilt and shame, ghosts of betrayal, ghosts of fear, and soulless ghosts of modernism, as the skeletal framework for your story, and the enduring story of the unlived life because of ghosts still in the room.

Required Books:
Hauntings: Dispelling the Ghosts Who Run Our Lives by James Hollis (Chiron Publications, 2013)
Handling the Truth: On the Writing of Memoir by Beth Kephart (Avery, 2013)

Shop local and purchase these books at The Twig, San Antonio’s veteran indie book shop.

barbara-renaud-gonzalez photoBárbara Renaud González is a freelance writer, activist, and journalist with articles and essays in many newspapers and magazines. For five years, she was a columnist for the San Antonio Express-News. Her novel Golondrina, Why Did You Leave Me? (2009) earned her the honor of being the first Chicana author published by UT Press. González also wrote the first children’s book on the life of voting rights pioneer Willie Velasquez, called The Boy Made of Lightning (2014). González’s essays and articles have appeared in publications such as The Nation, The Progressive, Ms. Magazine, and the Los Angeles Times. Her commentaries have aired on NPR’s Morning Edition.


Class Filled

*Members—please sign up by phone at 210.734.9673 to receive 10% discount on class registration.
Saturday 10am–3pm workshops include a light snack. Please bring a brown bag lunch.
View our cancellation policy here http://geminiink.org/cancellation-policy/

We live in a world that denies the story that haunts us, whether it be very bad, or lovely, or graceful…The more that we face that ghost, the more we can accommodate the story that that ghost wants to tell… Ghosts are part of who we live with.

In this interview, Bárbara Renaud González discusses facing the ghosts that haunt our lives, what it’s like getting older as a writer, and why we are so drawn to memoir. (more…)